History of Urban Cooperative Banks in India


The term Urban Co-operative Banks (UCBs), though not formally defined, refers to primary cooperative banks located in urban and semi-urban areas. These banks, till 1996, were allowed to lend money only for non-agricultural purposes. This distinction does not hold today. These banks were traditionally centered around communities, localities work place groups. They essentially lent to small borrowers and businesses.

Today, their scope of operations has widened considerably. The origins of the urban cooperative banking movement in India can be traced to the close of nineteenth century when, inspired by the success of the experiments related to the cooperative movement in Britain and the cooperative credit movement in Germany such societies were set up in India.

Cooperative societies are based on the principles of cooperation, - mutual help, democratic decision making and open membership. Cooperatives represented a new and alternative approach to organization as against proprietary firms, partnership firms and joint stock companies which represent the dominant form of commercial organization.

The Beginnings
The first known mutual aid society in India was probably the ‘Anyonya Sahakari Mandali’ organized in the erstwhile princely State of Baroda in 1889 under the guidance of Vithal Laxman also known as Bhausaheb Kavthekar. Urban co-operative credit societies, in their formative phase came to be organized on a community basis to meet the consumption oriented credit needs of their members.

Salary earners’ societies inculcating habits of thrift and self help played a significant role in popularizing the movement, especially amongst the middle class as well as organized labor. From its origins then to today, the thrust of UCBs, historically, has been to mobilize savings from the middle and low income urban groups and purvey credit to their members - many of which belonged to weaker sections. The enactment of Cooperative Credit Societies Act, 1904, however, gave the real impetus to the movement.

The first urban cooperative credit society was registered in Canjeevaram (Kanjivaram) in the erstwhile Madras province in October, 1904. Amongst the prominent credit societies were the Pioneer Urban in Bombay (November 11, 1905), the No.1 Military Accounts Mutual Help Co-operative Credit Society in Poona (January 9, 1906). Cosmos in Poona (January 18, 1906), Gokak Urban (February 15, 1906) and Belgaum Pioneer (February 23, 1906) in the Belgaum district, the Kanakavli-Math Co-operative Credit Society and the Varavade Weavers’ Urban Credit Society (March 13, 1906) in the South Ratnagiri (now Sindhudurg) district.

The most prominent amongst the early credit societies was the Bombay Urban Co-operative Credit Society, sponsored by Vithaldas Thackersey and Lallubhai Samaldas established on January 23, 1906. The Cooperative Credit Societies Act, 1904 was amended in 1912, with a view to broad basing it to enable organization of non-credit societies. The Maclagan Committee of 1915 was appointed to review their performance and suggest measures for strengthening them. The committee observed that such institutions were eminently suited to cater to the needs of the lower and middle income strata of society and would inculcate the principles of banking amongst the middle classes.